GCC's Vet Tech Program Receives American Veterinary Medical Association Accreditation

Genesee Community College just learned that the American Veterinary Medical Association's Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA) conferred accreditation on Genesee's new Veterinary Technology program ten days ago, Interim Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Michael S. Stoll reported to the Board of Trustees yesterday evening.

Batavia, New York —Genesee Community College just learned that the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA) conferred accreditation on Genesee’s new Veterinary Technology program ten days ago, Interim Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Michael S. Stoll reported to the Board of Trustees yesterday evening. The CVTEA is the accrediting body for collegiate-level veterinary technology programs across the nation.

The accrediting committee granted a five-year accreditation to Genesee’s program. Toward the close of the five year period, the VTEAC will again review the program’s curricula, laboratories, externship opportunities, and the success of program graduates, Mr. Stoll said.

The Veterinary Technology program prepares students to provide specialized care for a variety of domestic and farm animals, and to support the activities and operations of animal hospitals, clinics, shelters, research labs and zoos. The program requires 72 hours of coursework, including extensive lab work and supervised externships working with animals.

After completion of Genesee’s program, graduates are eligible to sit for the Veterinary Technician National Examination. Vet techs wishing to fully practice in New York State must pass the examination. Some graduates may wish to pursue bachelor’s degrees in the Veterinary Technology field, which are offered regionally at Medaille College and Cornell University. Genesee works with both institutions to help Veterinary Technology graduates move into bachelor’s programs if they wish.

President James M. Sunser congratulated and complimented the many individuals who helped make accreditation possible. “I am very proud of the efforts of the entire campus to make this happen,” he said. He cited the efforts of Dr. Carolyn M. Caccamise, director of the program, the College’s Buildings and Grounds staff, technology staff, and many other faculty and staff members who provided assistance during the rigorous accreditation process.

Mr. Stoll said that the veterinary technology field is expanding, and that numerous positions are available for graduates of the program. The College will have 24 student slots available in the program during fall 2013, and has already received 40 applications from prospective students, Mr. Stoll said.

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