The Civil War Fall Lecture Series

What:The Civil War Fall Lecture Series Lecture #2- “In the Full Strength of Manhood: The Soldier’s Death in the American Civil War” When:Tuesday, October 4, 2011 / 7:00 to 9:00pm Where:Genesee Community College Conable Technology Building T102 / One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020 Who:All history enthusiasts BACKGROUND: While continuing its commitment to educate students and the surrounding communities, Genesee Community College will host the second of four lectures in a series on the Civil War.

What:The Civil War Fall Lecture Series
Lecture #2- “In the Full Strength of Manhood: The Soldier’s Death in the American Civil War”

When:Tuesday, October 4, 2011 / 7:00 to 9:00pm

Where:Genesee Community College
Conable Technology Building T102 / One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020

Who:All history enthusiasts

BACKGROUND:

While continuing its commitment to educate students and the surrounding communities, Genesee Community College will host the second of four lectures in a series on the Civil War. The lecture series takes place in the Conable Technology Building of GCC’s Batavia Campus. All the lectures are free and open to the public. Pre-registration for each lecture is encouraged. The second lecture, “In the Full Strength of Manhood: The Soldier’s Death in the American Civil War” is led by Sarah Handley-Cousins, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Buffalo.

Lecture Abstract: In 1864, Union general and Geneseo, New York, native James S. Wadsworth died in the corner of a Confederate hospital tent. He was alone, in enemy hands, and rendered unconscious by a mortal wound in his head. Although Wadsworth was left immediately and permanently unresponsive and paralyzed by the injury, his mourners later praised Wadsworth's final moments as a perfect example of a manly, heroic death, describing his calm demeanor and "intelligent eyes." Similar scenes abound in the letters, diaries, memorials, and even popular literature written during the war, descriptions that emphasized soldiers' masculine control, their acceptance of fate, and reinforcement of the overall goals of the war. What motivated Wadsworth's mourners - and those left behind by the hundreds of thousands of dead soldiers - to create these exaggerated and largely imagined deaths for their lost loved ones?

The subsequent lectures, held in conjunction with the Genesee County Civil War Commemoration Committee, include the following topics:
•November 1 -“New York Politics and the Civil War” by Garth Swanson, professor of History at GCC;
• December 13 -"The Impact of the Civil War on Genesee County: Waving Good Bye to your Loved Ones" by Sue Conklin, Genesee County Historian.

To register for any of the Civil War lectures, please contact The BEST Center at 585-345-6868 or email bestcenter@genesee.edu.

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